Prince Philip dies: Archbishop Justin Welby will lead special remembrance service today

The Archbishop of Canterbury will lead a remembrance service for Prince Philip at Canterbury Cathedral today. 

The service is expected to start at 10.30am with Justin Welby paying tribute to the Duke of Edinburgh after his death on Friday morning.  

It comes ahead of Philip’s funeral next Saturday, which is expected to be officiated by Mr Welby and David Conner, the Dean of Windsor.

Mr Welby, giving a reflection from the chapel at Lambeth Palace, paid tribute to the Duke last night and said Philip had been someone with a ‘deep and genuine sense of service and humility’.

He said: ‘It wasn’t ‘me, me, me’. It was about the world, about those he served, and in doing that his own role was more and more significant.

‘He had a righteous impatience. He would not accept the status quo. If things were not right, he would say so and say so quickly, and clearly, and often bluntly.

‘Prince Philip, also though, had a deep and genuine sense of service and humility.’

He described him as someone who ‘knew the talents he had and what he could bring, and he brought them 100%, at full throttle, right through his life’. 

Buckingham Palace announced yesterday that Prince Philip’s ceremonial royal funeral will take place on April 17 at St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle, and a national minute’s silence will be observed as it begins at 3pm. The funeral service will be broadcast worldwide.

Justin Welby, giving a reflection from the chapel at Lambeth Palace, paid tribute to the Duke last night and said Philip had been someone with a ‘deep and genuine sense of service and humility

Buckingham Palace announced yesterday that Prince Philip's ceremonial royal funeral will take place on April 17 at St George's Chapel in Windsor Castle

Buckingham Palace announced yesterday that Prince Philip’s ceremonial royal funeral will take place on April 17 at St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle

A special Sunday service will take place at Canterbury Cathedral today to mark the passing of Prince Philip. It will be led by Justin Welby

A special Sunday service will take place at Canterbury Cathedral today to mark the passing of Prince Philip. It will be led by Justin Welby

The Duke will be taken to St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle on a Land Rover he helped to design, and will be flanked by pall bearers from the Royal Marines, Regiments, Corps and Air Stations.

The decision to carry Philip in the custom-built car comes after he is said to have told the Queen: ‘Just stick me in the back of a Land Rover and drive me to Windsor.’

Immediately behind the Land Rover, the Prince of Wales and other members of the family, likely to be the Duke’s other children and some of his grandchildren including Harry and William, will proceed on foot.

Prince Harry will travel to the UK to be with his family for the service, but his wife Meghan will remain at their home in California after being ‘advised not to travel’ by her doctor. 

Official royal mourning will then take place for two weeks after the funeral.  

Only 30 people – expected to be the Duke’s children, grandchildren and other close family – will attend as guests. 

Prime Minister Boris Johnson will not be among guests, having stepped aside to allow for the attendance of as many family members as possible during coronavirus restrictions, No 10 said last night. 

The Land Rover ‘hearse’ is a fitting tribute to Philip – the nation’s longest consort – who was known for his practical skills and his enduring interest in design and engineering.

The purpose-built Land Rover was specially modified to carry a coffin – in a project that the duke helped with many years ago.

The vehicle will process slowly through the grounds of Windsor Castle ahead of the funeral, draped in his personal standard, a wreath of flowers and his naval cap and sword.

A bearer party from the Grenadier Guards will place the coffin on the Land Rover at the state entrance of the castle, before the vehicle begins the eight-minute journey at walking pace to the west steps of the chapel.

The Duke's Defender 130 Gun Bus: This Defender Gun Bus, built from a Td5 130, was commissioned by the Duke of Edinburgh in 2005. After a 45-minute meeting at Sandringham with the Duke this design was created, Land Rover said. It is understood the vehicle that carries his coffin will be similar to the one picture here

The Duke’s Defender 130 Gun Bus: This Defender Gun Bus, built from a Td5 130, was commissioned by the Duke of Edinburgh in 2005. After a 45-minute meeting at Sandringham with the Duke this design was created, Land Rover said. It is understood the vehicle that carries his coffin will be similar to the one picture here

The Queen is pictured with the Duke of Edinburgh in 2007 walking at Broadlands, Hampshire

The Queen is pictured with the Duke of Edinburgh in 2007 walking at Broadlands, Hampshire

It will be flanked by pall bearers reflecting the duke’s special relationships with the military – the Royal Marines, Regiments, Corps and Air Stations.

Immediately behind the Land Rover, the Prince of Wales and other members of the royal family, likely to be the duke’s other children and some of his grandchildren, will proceed on foot.

A specially modified Land Rover, Naval procession and royal mourning: Prince Philip’s funeral details are released by palace 

2.40pm: Coffin emerges from State Entrance of Windsor Castle

The duke’s coffin, accompanied by the Dean of Windsor and the Lord Chamberlain, will be moved to the State Entrance of Windsor Castle by a Bearer Party of The Queen’s Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.

The coffin will emerge and the Bearer Party will place it onto a specially modified Land Rover, which Philip helped to design, to transport it to St George’s Chapel.

2.45pm: The procession leaves for St George’s Chapel

The procession from the state entrance to the West Steps of the chapel will take eight minutes.

The Prince of Wales and members of the royal family will take part in the procession on foot, immediately behind the duke’s coffin, together with staff from Philip’s household.

The route of the procession will be lined by representatives drawn from the Royal Navy, the Royal Marines, the Highlanders, 4th Battalion Royal Regiment of Scotland and the Royal Air Force.

Minute guns will be fired by the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery from the east lawn of Windsor Castle for the duration of the procession, and the Curfew Tower Bell will toll.

2.53pm: The Land Rover reaches the West Steps of the chapel

A Guard of Honour and Band from The Rifles will receive the coffin at the foot of the West Steps, with the national anthem being played as the coffin enters Horseshoe Cloister.

A bearing party of Royal Marines will carry the coffin up the steps and pause for the minute’s silence.

3.00pm: National minute of silence

Following the minute’s silence, the Dean of Windsor, together with the Archbishop of Canterbury, will receive the coffin at the top of the West Steps.

In keeping with coronavirus guidelines to limit guests inside the chapel, most of the procession will not enter the chapel, except for members of the royal family, and the duke’s private secretary Archie Miller Bakewell.

The funeral service will begin as the coffin enters St George’s Chapel.

The Land Rover’s poignant role in the funeral proceedings always formed part of Operation Forth Bridge – the codename given to the plans following Philip’s death. 

A senior Palace official said: ‘The Duke of Edinburgh had a hand many years ago in the design of these vehicles.’ The official added that there were two Land Rovers for ‘belt and braces’.

The Queen has approved the Prime Minister’s recommendation of national mourning, which began on April 9 and runs until and including the day of the funeral.  

Originally 800 people would have been due to gather to pay their respects to the nation’s longest serving consort, but Philip is known to have wanted a low key affair. 

The first guest confirmed by the palace was the duke’s long-standing close aide, his private secretary Brigadier Archie Miller Bakewell, who will be one of the few, and possibly only, non-royals invited to attend.

Brigadier Miller Bakewell had been the Duke’s right hand man for 11 years, taking on the role in 2010. 

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