Pfizer and Moderna DECLINED joining Johnson & Johnson study of vaccine blood clot risks

Johnson & Johnson asked other vaccine makers to join a study of blood clot risks, but Pfizer and Moderna DECLINED – and only AstraZeneca got on board

Johnson & Johnson privately asked other vaccine manufacturers to join a study of blood clot risks, reported the Wall Street JournalOnly AstraZeneca, which has been dealing with reports of patients suffering blood clots after receiving its vaccine, agreed to join the studyExecutives from Pfizer and Moderna declined the offer, saying their vaccines appeared safeJ&J’s vaccine is currently paused after nine people – two in clinical trials and seven after the shot was approved – developed rare, but serious, blood clots 

Johnson & Johnson privately reached out to rival COVID-19 vaccine makers to join in an effort to study the risks of blood clots.

According to The Wall Street Journal, citing three people familiar with the matter, J&J wanted to form an informal alliance with other companies to communicate with one one voice about the benefits and risks of vaccines as well as blood clots. 

Only AstraZeneca – which has been at the center of a similar blood-clotting controversy for several weeks in Europe – agreed.

However, executives from both Pfizer Inc and Moderna Inc reportedly declined, saying their vaccines appeared safe. 

It comes as a pause of J&J’s vaccine continues after multiple people developed rare, but serious, blood clots within days after receiving the shot.

Johnson & Johnson privately asked other vaccine manufacturers to join a study of blood clot risks, reported the Wall Street Journal. Pictured: Boxes and vials of the J&J COVID-19 vaccine at National Jewish Hospital in Denver, March 6

J&J's vaccine was paused after nine people - two in clinical trials and seven after the shot was approved - developed rare, but serious, blood clots out of more than 7 million vaccinations

J&J’s vaccine was paused after nine people – two in clinical trials and seven after the shot was approved – developed rare, but serious, blood clots out of more than 7 million vaccinations

On Tuesday, the CDC and the FDA recommended the rollout of J&J’s shot after six women under age 50 developed blood clots within six to 13 days after being vaccinated.

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