Under-40s could also get alternative to Astrazeneca vaccine despite fears it could delay UK’s drive

Under-40s could also get an alternative to Astrazeneca vaccine despite fears that it could delay Britain’s inoculation drive by a MONTH

It was ruled under-30s should be offered an alternative to the AstraZeneca jabNew data from MHRA has indicated risk of a serious blood clot has increasedIt is understood the JCVI is now contemplating changing policy for under-40sBut analysts earlier predicted guidance change for under-30s would delay drive 

Under-40s could also get an alternative to the AstraZeneca vaccine despite fears that it could delay Britain’s inoculation drive by a month.

On April 7, the Government’s vaccine advisory group ruled that people aged between 18 and 29 should be offered either the Pfizer or Moderna jab instead of the AstraZeneca vaccine while experts continue to investigate its link to rare blood clots.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) found that, by the end of March, 79 of 20million Britons vaccinated with the AstraZeneca jab had suffered deadly blood clots in the brain or arteries, a rate of about one in 250,000. 

New data from the drugs watchdog has indicated the risk of forming a serious blood clot has increased to one in 126,000 over a fortnight.

It is understood that the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) is now contemplating further altering its policy ahead of the rollout to those aged 30 to 39, reports The Daily Telegraph.

But the Government’s scientific advisers are divided over whether to offer alternatives to under-40s, with analysts from Airfinity earlier predicting the change in guidance for those aged below 30 will hamper the nation’s vaccine drive. 

Amanda Krawczyk from Penrith is the first patients to arrive at the Penrith Auction Mart Vaccination Centre to receive the AstraZeneca vaccine on March 25

It is understood that the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) is now contemplating further altering its policy ahead of the rollout to those aged 30 to 39 (file photo)

It is understood that the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) is now contemplating further altering its policy ahead of the rollout to those aged 30 to 39 (file photo)

Some scientists believe the alternative should be offered to those aged 30 to 39, while others say there is not yet enough evidence to change the guidance further and potentially lower confidence in the vaccine.

Maarten Postma, a member of the JCVI and professor in pharmacoeconomics at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, told the Financial Times: ‘I would for sure support giving people who are 30 to 40 another vaccine.

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