Video shows toddler begging his father not leave before he boarded doomed KRI Nanggala-402 submarine

A heartbreaking video has emerged showing a toddler begging his father to stay at home before he left to board the doomed Indonesian military submarine which sank, killing all 53 sailors on the vessel. 

In the clip, First Lieutenant Imam Adi, 29, is blocked from leaving his room by his crying two-year-old son Aska who tries to shut the bedroom door with one hand while pushing his father back inside with the other.  

Adi can be seen laughing and saying ‘Papa needs to pee’ before kneeling down to try to comfort his son – but Aska repeatedly pushed his father while screaming ‘no, no, no’. 

This would have been the last time the father and son were able to be together because later that day, Adi boarded the KRI Nanggala-402 which sank to the seabed and split into three pieces off Bali with all those on board killed.  

Adi’s father Edy Sujianto said he was surprised by his grandson’s behaviour as Aska would usually not try and stop his father from leaving before going on duty. 

‘Usually, when [Adi] says goodbye, it’s normal,’ Sujianto told The Tribune News from his home on Java Island. ‘Yesterday until the door was closed, his father really couldn’t go.’  

The toddler pushed his father First Lieutenant Imam Adi, 29, into the room

In the heartbreaking clip, First Lieutenant Imam Adi, 29, is being blocked from leaving his room by his crying two-year-old son Aska who tries to shut the bedroom door with one hand while pushing his father back inside with the other

Aska repeatedly pushes his father while screaming 'No, no, no'Two-year-old Aska

Adi can be seen laughing and saying ‘Papa needs to pee’ before kneeling down to try and comfort his son – but Aska repeatedly pushed his father while screaming ‘No, no, no’

The Indonesian submarine KRI Nanggala (402) participates in a photo exercise during Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training in Indonesia, 2015

The Indonesian submarine KRI Nanggala (402) participates in a photo exercise during Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training in Indonesia, 2015

Underwater photo released Sunday by the Indonesian Navy shows parts of submarine KRI Nanggala that sank in Bali Sea, Indonesia

Underwater photo released Sunday by the Indonesian Navy shows parts of submarine KRI Nanggala that sank in Bali Sea, Indonesia

Indonesia's military has also officially announced that all 53 crew members are dead. Pictured: Underwater photograph of the sunken vessel

Indonesia’s military has also officially announced that all 53 crew members are dead. Pictured: Underwater photograph of the sunken vessel

But Sujianto said he did not want to be superstitious or want to think about how his grandson had tried to stop his father from leaving for the fateful vessel. ‘Maybe it’s just a coincidence,’ he said.  

Sujianto revealed that before boarding the ship, Adi had asked his family to pray that his mission on the submarine was smooth and safe.

‘Every time he want to work, [Adi] always gave news, be it via text message or telephone,’ the heartbroken father said. But no news came until the vessel was found at the bottom of the seabed off Bali. 

Adi’s wife filmed the exchange between father and son and it was later posted to Instagram before going viral. The clip was even reportedly viewed by Tri Rismaharini, the Indonesian Minister of Social Affairs.

Adi had served on the KRI Nanggala 402 since 2017 and had previously studied law in Korea and Los Angeles in the US. 

The video comes as more parts from the submarine were retrieved including an anchor and fluorescent orange safety suits for emergencies, authorities said. 

A day before the discovery, the navy first confirmed the retrieval of fragments from the submarine and declared that it had sunk, effectively ending any chance of finding survivors.

In another haunting video, released by devastated Indonesian military chiefs, the crew of the KRI Nanggala 402 were seen singing together on board just weeks before the craft sank. 

In the clip, some of the 53 sailors on the vessel can be seen smiling as they huddled around a man playing on his guitar for a rendition of the popular Indonesian hit ‘Sampai Jumpa’ that translates as ‘goodbye’ or ‘until we meet again’.

The Indonesian military has released a haunting video showing the crew of the KRI Nanggala-402 submarine singing along to a hit song called 'Goodbye'

The Indonesian military has released a haunting video showing the crew of the KRI Nanggala-402 submarine singing along to a hit song called ‘Goodbye’

Among the earlier items recovered from the submarine were a piece of the torpedo system and a bottle of grease used to lubricate periscopes.

They also found a prayer mat commonly used in Indonesia, the world’s most populous Muslim-majority nation.

Warships, planes and hundreds of military personnel had led a frantic search for the submarine since it disappeared this week during training exercises, hoping for a miracle rescue before its known oxygen reserves ran out.

But on Sunday, Indonesian military head Hadi Tjahjanto said there was no chance of finding any of the crew alive.

He said: ‘With deep sadness, I can say that all 53 personnel onboard have passed.

‘We received underwater pictures that are confirmed as the parts of the submarine, including its rear vertical rudder, anchors, outer pressure body, embossed dive rudder and other ship parts.

‘With this authentic evidence, we can declare that KRI Nanggala 402 has sunk and all the crew members are dead.’ 

Prabowo Subianto, the Indonesian Minister of Defence, has guaranteed college scholarships to all of the children who lost their fathers on the ill-fated submarine. 

The navy previously said it believes the submarine sank to a depth of 2,000-2,300ft, much deeper than its collapse depth of 655ft, at which point water pressure would be greater than the hull could withstand.

The submarine was conducting a torpedo drill in waters 60 miles north of the island of Bali on Wednesday, but failed to relay the results as expected

The submarine was conducting a torpedo drill in waters 60 miles north of the island of Bali on Wednesday, but failed to relay the results as expected

The discovery comes a day after the navy had first confirmed the retrieval of fragments from the submarine and declared that it had sunk, effectively ending any chance of finding survivors

The discovery comes a day after the navy had first confirmed the retrieval of fragments from the submarine and declared that it had sunk, effectively ending any chance of finding survivors

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