Ex-PM David Cameron has ‘all but abandoned’ plans for a £750million UK-China investment fund

Ex-prime minister David Cameron has ‘all but abandoned’ plans for a £750million UK-China investment fund amid rapidly cooling relationship between London and Beijing

Mr Cameron had high hopes of launching £750m UK-China investment fundIt would capitalise on Beijing’s ever increasing economic mightBut four years after first being mentioned the scheme has been put on ice 

Relations between London and Beijing have cooled over Hong Kong and Huawei  Cameron spokesman told the FT: ‘The UK-China fund has yet to be established.’ 

As prime minister, David Cameron hailed a new ‘golden era’ of financial relations between the UK and China as he went for a pint with President Xi.

But the thaw between the Communist Eastern giant and capitalist West he envisioned in 2015 has failed to materialise, leaving him facing another lost opportunity to make millions. 

Mr Cameron, who is heavily embroiled in the Greensill Capital lobbying row, had high hopes of launching a £750milllion UK-China investment fund, to capitalise on Beijing’s ever increasing economic might.

But plans for the scheme first discussed in 2017, to be set up with Tory peer Lord Chadlington, have been put on ice as the two nations clash over issues including spying, political freedom in Hong Kong and genocide of China’s Uighur Muslims.

A spokesman for Mr Cameron, who was prime minister from 2010 to 2016, told the Financial Times: ‘The UK-China fund has yet to be established.’ 

Mr Cameron enjoying a beer with President Xi during a state visit to Britain in 2015. But relations between the nations have cooled significantly since

Plans for the scheme first discussion in 2017, to be set up with Tory peer Lord Chadlington, have been put on ice as the two nations clash over issues including spying, political freedom in Hong Kong (above) and genocide of China's Uighur Muslims.

Plans for the scheme first discussion in 2017, to be set up with Tory peer Lord Chadlington, have been put on ice as the two nations clash over issues including spying, political freedom in Hong Kong (above) and genocide of China’s Uighur Muslims.

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