Garbage frontwoman Shirley Manson gets emotional as she talks about Michael Gudinski 

‘It’s still very hard to talk about’: Garbage frontwoman Shirley Manson gets emotional as she talks about music industry icon Michael Gudinski on The Project


Garbage frontwoman Shirley Manson was emotional as she spoke of her friend and late Australian music industry icon Michael Gudinski, on Thursday.

The 54-year-old, who spoke from Scotland via Zoom, fought back tears when she was asked about learning that Garbage’s new record – No Gods No Masters – was likely the last thing he listened to before his passing, on The Project.

She told the hosts: ‘Well, this is what I have been told by his team. They said that they saw on his computer that it (the new album) had been listened to and they could only assume it had been done that morning.’ 

'It's still very hard to talk about': Garbage frontwoman Shirley Manson became emotional as she discussed her friend and late music industry icon Michael Gudinski with The Project on Thursday

‘It’s still very hard to talk about’: Garbage frontwoman Shirley Manson became emotional as she discussed her friend and late music industry icon Michael Gudinski with The Project on Thursday

‘I mean, I don’t know, we weren’t there. It’s still very hard to talk about. We loved him and we’ll miss him,’ she said, welling up.

The Scottish singer-songwriter added: ‘I don’t know why I keep crying about Michael, it’s awful, I just can’t keep myself together, but he really was someone very special to us and I will miss him dearly forever.’ 

Before signing off, Shirley apologised profusely for getting emotional: ‘I’m crying on your show, it’s terrible! Sorry, guys, I lost my composure.’ 

Emotional: The 54-year-old, who spoke from Scotland via Zoom, fought back tears when she was asked about learning that Garbage's new record - No Gods No Masters - was likely the last thing he listened to before his passing, on The Project

Emotional: The 54-year-old, who spoke from Scotland via Zoom, fought back tears when she was asked about learning that Garbage’s new record – No Gods No Masters – was likely the last thing he listened to before his passing, on The Project

Gudinski had a long history and prosperous relationship with Garbage. 

In 1995 he signed the then-unknown American band to his Mushroom Records label in the UK and Australia.

With his reach and influence, Michael booked the band’s tours around Australia. They first performed in the country in October 1996. 

The Scottish singer-songwriter added: 'I don't know why I keep crying about Michael, it's awful, I just can't keep myself together, but he really was someone very special to us and I will miss him dearly forever'

The Scottish singer-songwriter added: ‘I don’t know why I keep crying about Michael, it’s awful, I just can’t keep myself together, but he really was someone very special to us and I will miss him dearly forever’

Humble beginnings: Gudinski had a long history and prosperous relationship with Garbage. In 1995 he signed the then-unknown American band to his Mushroom Records label in the UK and Australia

Humble beginnings: Gudinski had a long history and prosperous relationship with Garbage. In 1995 he signed the then-unknown American band to his Mushroom Records label in the UK and Australia

Michael, who was widely regarded as the ‘father of the Australian music industry’, suddenly passed away in Melbourne on March 2. 

Shirley was among the many high profile musicians to pay tribute to the Australian music industry giant following his passing.

In a post on Facebook she wrote she had ‘lost a beloved friend’ and ‘a person who loved on me, encouraged me, believed in me… even at times when I had completely lost faith in myself.’ 

A great loss: Michael, who was widely regarded as the 'father of the Australian music industry', suddenly passed away in Melbourne on March 2

A great loss: Michael, who was widely regarded as the ‘father of the Australian music industry’, suddenly passed away in Melbourne on March 2