Live Aid looks tipped for a comeback amid corona battle

Sir Bob Geldof’s concert Live Aid could make a comeback in the coronavirus fight, 37 years after the first gig’s fundraising efforts for Ethiopian famine relief. 

The gov.uk website shows that the rocker’s charity the Band Aid Charitable Trust, set up by the star prior to the original concert on 13 July 1985, applied to have the name protected back in November before the request was approved last month. 

Under the ‘Classes and Terms’ of the trademark request, the government website shows charity bosses are aiming to protect streaming rights of a possible concert as well as merchandise and monetary services.  

All-star: Sir Bob Geldof’s concert Live Aid could make a comeback in the coronavirus fight, 37 years after the first gig’s fundraising efforts for Ethiopian famine relief (L-R: George Michael, promoter Harvey Goldsmith, U2 lead singer Bono, Paul McCartney, Freddie Mercury)

The approved trademark had 11 sub-sections in its application, including what appears to be nods to the prospective of live streaming of an event. 

A host of other items also fell under, including: ‘Badges for wear, not of precious metal; accessories for apparel; decorative textile articles…

‘Brooches for clothing; hair ornaments, hair rollers, hair fastening articles; hair decorations; charms, other than for jewellery, keyrings or keychains; decorative charms for cellular phones’, in a nod to merchandise.  

Bob joined Midge Ure in setting up the concert, which saw performances from mega stars including Madonna and Queen and an audience including Princess Diana.

Approach: The gov.uk website shows that the rocker's charity the Band Aid Charitable Trust, set up by the star prior to the original concert on 13 July 1985, applied to have the name protected back in November before the request was approved last month

Approach: The gov.uk website shows that the rocker’s charity the Band Aid Charitable Trust, set up by the star prior to the original concert on 13 July 1985, applied to have the name protected back in November before the request was approved last month

During the show, nearly two billion people – a third of humanity – tuned in to Live Aid, the global jukebox that raised millions for the starving of Africa, with 72,000 lucky enough to be at Wembley to see history in the making. 

The concert saw 90,000 watching on a big screen in Philadelphia’s JFK Stadium, and the event was beamed live to 150 countries.

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