Queen’s Balmoral estate launches new Highland organic pale ale in tribute to Prince Philip

The Queen‘s private Scottish retreat is launching an organic pale ale – a favourite tipple of the late Prince Philip.

The Duke of Edinburgh, who passed away aged 99 in April, was a famous lover of real ale after getting a taste for it in the Navy and often had a small bottle from his private cellar as a night cap. 

Now the estate has launched its own beer called The Invergelder, named after the farm at Balmoral, which will be available in a six-pack.

It comes days after rangers on the 50,000-acre estate made a plea asking litter louts who left empty beer cans in a suitcase to come and collect their ‘lost property’. 

‘We are proud to announce the launch of our very own Highland Organic Pale Ale! The Invergelder,’ read a post on the Balmoral Castle and Estate Facebook page.

Balmoral has launched its own beer called The Invergelder, named after the farm on the Scottish estate, which will be available in a six-pack

Balmoral has launched its own beer called The Invergelder, named after the farm on the Scottish estate, which will be available in a six-pack

‘Named after the farm at Balmoral, this refreshing ale is best served cold and is now available from our gift shop and restaurant.

‘Keep an eye on our social channels as The Invergelder will soon be available to order as a pack of six at a special introductory price.’ 

The Duke of Edinburgh’s favourite pint was from the now-defunct Boddingtons Brewery, and he’s known to have turned down the finest Italian wines in favour of whatever beer was available.

In a tribute to his grandfather – who died in April aged 99 – Prince Harry described him ‘beer in hand’ telling his grieving family to ‘get on with it’.

And being Prince consort for 70 years, the Duke was afforded plenty of opportunities to travel across the UK and beyond and try out different brews.

The Duke of Edinburgh, who passed away aged 99 in April, was a famous lover of real ale after getting a taste for it in the Navy and often had a small bottle from his private cellar as a night cap (pictured during a tour of the Boags brewery in Launceston, Australia in 2000)

The Duke of Edinburgh, who passed away aged 99 in April, was a famous lover of real ale after getting a taste for it in the Navy and often had a small bottle from his private cellar as a night cap (pictured during a tour of the Boags brewery in Launceston, Australia in 2000)

Boddingtons, a regional brewery in Manchester, topped his list before it ceased operations in 2005, but he also favoured Double Diamond Burton Pale Ale. 

It comes after Balmoral launched its own gin in May – a £60-a-bottle (which includes £8 express delivery) brand called Ballochbuie, named after a forest on the estate. It is believed to be the most expensive of the Royal gins so far.

‘We are proud to announce the launch of our very own Premium Balmoral Gin, distilled with hand-picked botanicals from the estate’s Ballochbuie forest,’ said the estate previously.

‘This special pre order price includes express courier delivery service so order now to be one of the first to sample our deliciously refreshing Ballochbuie Gin.

‘Please note that this product can only be purchased if you are aged 18 years of age or over and is only available for shipping within the UK.’

Balmoral also has a 20cl malt whisky which sells for £18 and a 70cl for £56 which is ‘distilled uniquely for Balmoral Estates at Royal Lochnagar Distillery’.  

Balmoral launched its own gin in May - a £60-a-bottle (which includes £8 express delivery) brand called Ballochbuie, named after a forest on the estate. It is believed to be the most expensive of the Royal gins so far

Balmoral launched its own gin in May – a £60-a-bottle (which includes £8 express delivery) brand called Ballochbuie, named after a forest on the estate. It is believed to be the most expensive of the Royal gins so far

The monarch’s private estate north of the border costs about £3 million a year to run with about half the income needed coming from tourism and related enterprises.

Last year the pandemic closed Balmoral to visitors for the main season and it will soon close for the expected summer holiday arrival next month of the Queen.

Earlier this year The Queen launched a £30-a-bottle sloe gin in her royal shops – a new addition to the growing collection of spirits bearing the royal crest.

The monarch has introduced the Buckingham Palace Sloe Gin, sold by the Royal Collection. The spirit, which presents a coronet on its front label, is made with hand picked whole sloe berries steeped in the Buckingham Palace gin.

Last year she launched Sandringham Celebration Gin at £50 for a 50cl bottle, made in a distillery on the estate in north Norfolk.

A Royal gin made from botanicals in the Buckingham Palace garden also went on sale last year.

The Buckingham tipple is made from 12 botanical, several of which have been handpicked from the Queen's garden

The Buckingham tipple is made from 12 botanical, several of which have been handpicked from the Queen’s garden 

The Royal Collection Trust launched a premium small-batch London dry gin for sale in its shops.

The spirit is infused with citrus and herbal notes derived from 12 botanicals, several of which are from Buckingham Palace garden, including lemon verbena, hawthorn berries, bay leaves and mulberry leaves.

All profits from sales of that gin go to The Royal Collection Trust.

Prince Charles’s Highgrove has its own organic London dry garden botantical gin – selling at £39.95.

The Queen Mother famously enjoyed a daily tipple before lunch of gin mixed with Dubonnet and a slice of lemon – with the pips carefully removed.

Her lifelong affection for the popular drink also prompted her old Scottish home in Caithness to join the gin renaissance sweeping the UK – by helping make its own associated brand.

The Castle of Mey previously teamed up with mainland Britain’s most northerly gin distillery, just a few miles away from the former Royal residence, to produce the tipple.

The £40-a-bottle gin is made with herbs gathered from around the walls of the Castle of Mey.

At one of her official visits, the Queen Mother, who died in 2002 aged 101, was surprised by her cheeky host, who instead of offering her tea as usual, commented: ‘I hear you like gin.’

She replied immediately: ‘I hadn’t realised I enjoyed that reputation. But as I do, perhaps you could make it a large one.’